UNIVERSAL PICTURES COMMISSARY

I don’t know what kind of nerd this makes me, but I was fascinated to find a cup of coffee cost five cents in 1932, and, if you wanted that coffee with cream and sugar it was called a “Boston” and it would cost you ten cents…

By the way, a secretary in 1932 made about twenty-one dollars a week.

Here’s Universal Pictures the year it was completed, 1915:

1915 Universal

And, the menu from the commissary, 1932:

1932.

breakfast back

9 comments

  1. Fascinating Miss Lester
    How interesting that milk and sugar were still luxuries back then – doubling the price of a beverage.
    I guess it just goes to show how the real cost of food has tumbled over the last decades, from about half a household’s expenditure to just ten cents in the dollar today.
    Though whether it can all promise to be ‘purest food’ as that served up by Turner’s is an entirely different matter.
    Much the same with scent I believe – within the reach of so many more these days, but is it a cheapened commodity?

    • I know that here in the States the price of food has plummeted since the 1970’s. Actually, it was President Richard Nixon who instigated price fixing and ever since our prices have been controlled. (Earl Butz was the Agricultural Secretary, I could on and on about that name, but I think I’ll leave it to more refined wits than mine.)

      In Italy (I think) they spend over 15% of their income on food (compared to America’s 6%) – and it’s such a part of their culture – and it’s soooo good.

  2. You never run out of this stuff, do you? You’re amazing. You must secretly live in a studio warehouse. I loved your Valentine photos. Back then, photographers were more like artists or perhaps people were just better looking. Good luck with the novel.

    • Thank you, sir!
      A little while ago there was a furor over at 20th Century Fox because the big wigs thought it would be a good idea to destroy all the periodicals (going back to the early part of the 20th century *ahem*) and there was such a stink they were forced to preserve the archive. Thank heavens!
      As to the beauty in previous generations, it was all in the lighting, and a little thing called bone structure 😉

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