He rules the season – the inestimable Lon Chaney

You know… I’m all into the architecture, this was the home of Lon Chaney, Sr.

Lon Chaney Sr house

Lon Chaney (April 1, 1883 – August 26, 1930), born Leonidas Frank Chaney, was an American actor during the age of silent films. He is regarded as one of the most versatile and powerful actors of early cinema, renowned for his characterizations of tortured, often grotesque and afflicted characters, and his groundbreaking artistry with makeup. Chaney is known for his starring roles in such silent horror films as The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera. His ability to transform himself using makeup techniques he developed earned him the nickname “The Man of a Thousand Faces.”

via Lon Chaney (Sr.) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

All I know is that I’m not posting his portrait from Phantom of the Opera because it still scares the heck out of me.

Annex - Chaney Sr., Lon (Miracle Man, The)_02

8 comments

    • I will have to send you pix of what “Arts and Crafts” looks like here, have you heard of the Pasadena architects Greene and Greene? It’s a whole different vernacular. Strangely, we would call Chaney’s house English, or Mock Tudor.

  1. I am a great fan of Arts and Crafts and have rather a lot of the UK version in my house where it blends with other influences such as Bloomsbury and The Middle and Far East.I have fairly large framed design by Voysey for wallpaper, in pride of standing on a simple wooden cupboard in my sitting room.I practically salivate at almost anything Voysey has ever done.

    • I get the feeling Arts and Crafts in the UK was much more associated with Art Nouveau than it was here, it has hints of it in the United States, but the architecture is more Japanese influenced and is more reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie Houses. Now I have to look up Voysey!

  2. Think should have said, pride of place.My usual attention to detail.By the way in case you do not know the decoration to be seen on the face of the wall under the gable to the far right is called pargetting in Britain and is traditional in some regions over here on older buildings and those influenced by them.

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