The curious circumstances under which I finally became aware of Doctor Who…in epistolary form

Dear Dena Paz (of course it’s an alias!),
 –
The reason I haven’t checked in sooner is because on August 18th, the Kid flew back to school and that night I had the most severe freaking migraine of my life and I’ve been dealing with the aftermath all week. Happily I am in contact with my most wonderful GP (who had been on vacation) and he is kicking ass and getting me in to be seen. Damn, that was a mouthful. I probably could have been more concise and less crude, but you get the picture.

I think at my age what they’ll do for my head is fiddle with my dwindling hormones and I will be fine. Or make my hormones dwindle and I will be fine…at any rate…I read about it in the paper.

I will paint you a word portrait of my present state, lying low — in what could be taken for pajamas, eating dry Cheerios out of a Baggie, watching Doctor Who on my computer…something about carnivorous snow at Christmas, with Richard E. Grant playing a Victorian zombie…and having a very nice time.
 –
Love, Vickie
 Dr. Who Grant 2
Dearest, darling, Dena Paz,
 –
I saw Dr. Synapse yesterday!

The whopper migraine was just that, and the symptoms that followed—one droopy side of face, tearing eyes, change in vision (which was caused by my right eye’s pupil being more dilated than the left in response to light) that concerned my GP (Who am I kidding? Scared the HECK out of me!)—were consistent with the changes that can happen to the autonomic system in the wake of a severe episode. That they resolved at the same time and yesterday I felt completely well means no stroke or, future likelihood of stroke.
 –
The hormonal black box is still in existence, and either the Times got it wrong in their reporting, or I miscontrued. Tinkering with hormones usually makes migraines even more dreadful. And, the fact that I must be perimenopausal also tends to make migraines get worse. I did get a good laugh out of the doctor by posing a hypothetical, “So, when I finally go through menopause at 78…” Upshot, preventative medication and some vitamin supplements.

I love this new neurologist, we talked for over an hour, and as it turns out he is a past student of my old buddy, Dr. A. Tėte de Cuvée, an esteemed professor and researcher here in L.A.

I AM SO RELIEVED, and I think we are going to get my migraines down to a dull roar—the doctor said at least halved, and what he’s shooting for is one a month, a tiny migraine that melts away at the first hint of medication. I suspect he wants me to tell Dr. Cuvée that he is genius and possibly the most gifted student he ever had…
 –
Love, Vickie

7 comments

  1. As a fellow migraine sufferer, I feel your pain. Mine began in my teens, though, so menopause was unrelated. I rarely have them any more, but when I get the first flashes of visual distortion, I take Tylenol. Then I get a minor headache only. If not, I get a whopper with nausea and aphasia. Nasty.

    I hope you find your answer soon. They’re all different from what I’ve read. Mine are triggered by red wine and good beer. Sucks.

    • Aphasia! Damn.

      The neurologist said when he would get migraines as a teen they would present with slurred speech and loss of equilibrium and people thought he was intoxicated.

      Any way you slice it, horrible. I’m glad you’ve got the migraines under control. Hugs from here, V

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