Reprise: Palm Springs stands in for Shangri-La during the filming of Lost Horizon

For a beautifully researched post on Art Director Stephen Goosson please turn to Steve Vaught’s VASTLY interesting blog:

Shangri-La has been found! It’s in Denver! | Paradise Leased.

You’ve probably guessed by now that I’m in Palm Springs. A few days ago I hiked Tahquitz Canyon with my best beloved and friends. There was a bonhomie on the easy trail that was quite lovely, people from all over the world offering each other their cameras and taking pictures and it reminded me that part of LOST HORIZON was shot here.

In the 1937 film:

Lost+Horizon+Tahquitz+scene+1

The waterfall today:

IMG_7368

The craggy rocks that surround the canyon:

red rock wall tahquitz canyon

The book cover:

Lost Horizon James Hilton

The set:

Poster - Lost Horizon (1937)_32

21 Comments

    • December 30, 2012
      Reply

      I read the book last summer in that dopey daze that comes of spending a lot of time visiting a dying parent in the hospital – and I have to say it actually helped keep me calm. However, judging from my reaction on Christmas Eve when I popped “Christmas in Connecticut” into the DVR – a burst of unexpected tears (it reminded me of my mom) – I better not watch it for a while…

      • December 30, 2012

        We all know it’s coming, we hear constantly how it’s a rite of passage none of us escape, but actually getting there and dealing with it, living with the absence of those who above all else meant ‘comfort’ to us makes us into children again. Sending a big hug your way…

      • December 31, 2012

        Thank you, S.K. Wishing you the happiest of New Year’s. xox, V

  1. December 31, 2012
    Reply

    I just saw the play “Other Desert Cities” and they have a really magnificent set with these mountains in the background looming over the interiors.

  2. February 21, 2014
    Reply

    I loved the film and later loved the book.It has always just taken me away from this world.

    • February 21, 2014
      Reply

      Me too! I find it, the book, very soothing.

      • February 21, 2014

        The book and film both put me in a sort of trance or reverie which has a calming effect on me also.I get taken to a dream place.I suppose on a larger scale that is what the work did for many during the very troubled period in which it was set.

  3. February 21, 2014
    Reply

    I’ve loved the book since I was a teenager (although the cover of my copy is not as lovely as the one above). As for the movie: Ronald Colman. Enough said.

    • February 21, 2014
      Reply

      Maedez,I have two copies.One British and the other an elderly American paperback.Its one of those books that I would like quite a few editions of as its interesting to see what sorts of covers,illustations etc they have.One of those lovely Folio Editions would be very nice.I wonder whether it has ever been brought out in a comic book format?

      In passing my film copy is from a British Newspaper.Over here they often give free films away when you buy the paper.

      • February 22, 2014

        I bought an “elderly paperback copy” when I was a teenager. It was already beat-up when I purchased it and, although I have taken fine care of it, it is not exactly pretty. I should probably source out a more handsome edition. I love seeing alternate covers of books, and ocasionally post about them on my blog. It is quite fascinating to see how covers evolve over time, and how they are often given such different looks from country to country.

        Do they give away free films in order to entice consumers to buy newspapers? Over here, newspapers are barely keeping afloat.

      • February 22, 2014

        Maedez,I have some books that I now collect mainly for their artwork such as the multiple productions of the once best selling Brit author Dennis Wheatly and the Pan Book of Horror.The recent film The Lost Airman is in fact based on an old Wheatly book -The Haunting of Toby Jugg.

        I cannot really enlighten you as to why the newspapers over here are so generous with films.I am very grateful that they are.They are always presented in simple cardborad sleeves with a picture on the front and some information on the back.

        The papers are also equally generous with music CDs which are also given away and represent an amazing cross section of different types of music including live concerts.As I am a huge music fan I take full advantage of this.

        A substantial proportion of these DVDs and CDs also end up in Charity shops{goodwill stores} and as they cannot be resold as such, piles of them can be bought for a donation of mere pennies.

    • February 21, 2014
      Reply

      It’s a book that calms me down, for some reason. I’ve read it a few times when my life was really stressful. I love it too.

      • February 22, 2014

        I think I am going to read it again, once I am back to reading fiction. Probably in a month or two. It’s been awhile, but I enjoyed it immensely the few times I read it when I was younger.

      • February 22, 2014

        I’ve got a stack of books to read, and a couple of them were recommended by you! Merci!

      • February 22, 2014

        Yay! I hope you like them. You’ll have to let me know if my recommendations hit the spot. 🙂

  4. December 13, 2014
    Reply

    For me, it’s “It’s a Wonderful Life” – remembering my dad. But I still watch it. And cry. Hell, it made me cry before my dad died, so now I just have a better reason.

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