“No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight of the soul.” Ingrid Bergman, wait, nope, make that Ingmar!

Oh my heavens, did I screw up or what? And thanks to an astute comment the author of this quote is revealed:

This photograph was published in the IHT on Dec. 19,1970, with the caption: “Ingmar Bergman’s favorite picture of himself.” The photographer, Bo-Erik Gyberg, said that Bergman “commented to me that his profound interest in music made him like to be depicted as a conductor, as in the photo.” Credit Bo-Erik Gyberg

Here’s the complete quote from Irene:

“Film as dream, film as music. No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight room of the soul. A little twitch in our optic nerve, a shock effect: twenty-four illuminated frames a second, darkness in between, the optic nerve incapable of registering darkness. At the editing table, when I run the strip of film through, frame by frame, I still feel that dizzy sense of magic of my childhood: in the darkness of the wardrobe, I slowly wind on one frame after another, see the almost imperceptible changes, wind faster – a movement.”

Ingmar Bergman

7 comments

  1. It’s a beautiful quote, but it belongs to Ingmar Bergman, not to Ingrid. He wrote it in his autobiography “The Magic Lantern”. Unfortunately, the almighty internet “changed” its source through repeated misattributions.

      • No problem! Here’s the entire quote, if you’re interested. (The context is him speaking about the cinema of Tarkovsky, Fellini, Kurosawa, Bunuel, Melies, and saying “When film is not a document, it is dream.”)

        “Film as dream, film as music. No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight room of the soul. A little twitch in our optic nerve, a shock effect: twenty-four illuminated frames a second, darkness in between, the optic nerve incapable of registering darkness. At the editing table, when I run the strip of film through, frame by frame, I still feel that dizzy sense of magic of my childhood: in the darkness of the wardrobe, I slowly wind on one frame after another, see the almost imperceptible changes, wind faster – a movement.”

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