“Have you ever heard of anyone who drank while he worked? You’re thinking of Faulkner. He does sometimes — and I can tell right in the middle of a page when he’s had his first one.” Ernest Hemingway

Writers can be quick with the barbed quip. Sometimes they’re cruel to each other. Sometimes they are vicious about who employs them (like a movie studio), or where they live (like Los Angeles).

This city has caught a lot of flack from the literary world. William Faulkner, a prolific and talented screenwriter — and by most accounts a sweet gentleman — had some famously rude things to say about the industry, and the place that, for many years, financed his Mississippi lifestyle. Find out why, and what was said today in delightful and erudite (author!) William Kuhn’s interview with your truly.

To read all about it, please click here.

We invite you to type us a message and join the conversation there or here.

William Faulkner in Hollywood. Photo by Alfred Eriss/Pix Inc./Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

2 comments

  1. Susannah, you have such a feel for Hollywood, and writers. Hey, after reading about Harvey Weinstein, something (I don’t know what) inspired me to write this piece of flash fiction (under 500 words). Does it read true to you?

    Stage Direction
    By Lanny Morgnanesi

    “I’ll be a different kind of male friend. I won’t have sex with you. I won’t even try to have sex with you. And I won’t talk about sex with you. But when I’m with you, having sex with you is all I will think about. The worst part is, you’ll know it.”

    “How will I know it?”

    “You’ll see a vacant spot in my eyes. There will be a hesitation in all my moves. I’ll look at you as if something is wrong but nothing will be wrong.”

    “You should go have sex with somebody else, then come back to our friendship without any built up . . . pressure.”

    “Physical release is not it. It’s union.”

    “You want union?”

    “I don’t exactly want it. It’s that I want to want it. We all want things we really don’t want. It’s because when you don’t get them, there’s no loss. As we want while not wanting, there’s comfort and peace and real pleasure . . . pleasure in even simple moments.”

    “Why did you pick me to be in your play?”

    “For the shared moments. For the inspiration you provide. For giving me this hill to climb, and climb and climb.”

    “Will it be the same when my husband gets back from California?”

    “It might be better.”

    “I’m not sure I can work under these conditions.”

    “I think you’ll like it. It will feed something in you and take nothing away. It can’t harm you.”

    “Suppose I fall in love with you.”

    “You won’t. I know you won’t. You know you won’t. But we both might pretend. There will be a thrill in that.”

    “Are you doing this for the play?”

    “It’s for the play, and for everything else. Everything. You’re a star in the night sky and I’m navigating by you. I’ll never reach the star. I have no intention of reaching the star. I just want it to guide me, to push me forward.”

    “Are you supposed to guide me?”

    “That’s not important. Use it as you wish. But let’s stop. I’m violating my own rules. Get on stage with Alex and start with Act 2.”

    “The scene with the line, ‘I got up this morning and had nothing to think about’?”

    “That’s the one.”

  2. Ha! Very true!
    In general that kind of old-school lechery went out when the big corporations took over, but then Mr. W. was a rare one in that he ran his own show. I owe you an email, sorry I’ve been kinda kooky busy but I will write to you this weekend 🙂 .

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